Posts Tagged ‘Pitchfork’

Steve Albini….

October 6, 2010

Here’s a quote by Albini featured in GQ magazine and also on Pitchfork‘s website.
First here’s what Steve says about Sonic Youth: “I don’t know the exact circumstances of Sonic Youth’s decision… A lot of that stuff was offensive to me and I saw it as a sellout and a corruption of a perfectly valid, well-oiled music scene. Sonic Youth… chose to join the mainstream culture and become a foot soldier for that culture’s encroachment into my neck of the woods by acting as scouts. I thought it was crass and I thought it reflected poorly on them. I still consider them friends and their music has its own integrity, but that kind of behavior– I can’t say that I think it’s not embarrassing for them. I think they should be embarrassed about it.” OUCH!!!

GQ also asked: “How would you describe your fashion?” He answered: “I think fashion is repulsive. The whole idea that someone else can make clothing that is supposed to be in style and make other people look good is ridiculous. It sickens me to think that there is an industry that plays to the low self-esteem of the general public. I would like the fashion industry to collapse. I think it plays to the most superficial, most insecure parts of human nature. I hope GQ as a magazine fails. I hope that all of these people who make a living by looking pretty are eventually made destitute or forced to do something of substance. At least pornography has a function.”

I guess he doesn’t like urban outfitters or the fact that Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon has a fashion line featured there.
Read the whole interview in GQ here.

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Joanna Newsom’s thoughts on Lady Gaga

May 10, 2010

“I may have contradicted myself. My problem isn’t actually with Lady Gaga. But there’s not much in her music to distinguish it from other glossy, formulaic pop. She just happens to wear slightly weirder outfits than Britney Spears. But they’re not that weird– they’re mostly just skimpy. She’s fully marketing her body/sexuality; she’s just doing it while wearing, like, a ‘fierce’ telephone hair-hat. Her sexuality has no scuzziness, no frank raunchiness, in the way that, say, Peaches, or even Grace Jones, have– she’s Arty Spice! And, meanwhile, she seems to take herself so oddly seriously, the way she talks about her music in the third person, like she’s Brecht or something. She just makes me miss Cyndi Lauper. […] I shouldn’t have called Madonna a dumb-ass. Her music and she have just gotten so boring to me, this last decade. I think maybe she doesn’t hold her money very gracefully, the way some people can’t hold their drink. But one thing she is surely not is dumb.”

I pulled this quote off of the pitchfork article: Newsom Takes on Gaga, Madonna, The DJ’s from standing on the verge pointed this one out, you should listen to them on Wednesdays from 7 till 9pm at KRUI 89.7fm Iowa City.

Here’s Joanna, with an awfully pretty tune entitled Sprout and the Bean:

Imagination Blind

April 3, 2010


Dinosaur Jr. bringing you Imagination Blind. Here’s Lou Barlow doing an acoustic version, I love it.

This track is the closing track to Dinosaur Jr’s 9th album Farm released in June of 2009 2 years after their 2007 release Beyond. Now whats interesting about this is that Beyond was their first release in 10 years. They hadn’t released an album since 1997’s Hand it Over, and when Beyond came out and I heard it I thought it was great and they would never be able to top it. Well I was wrong, 2 years later they released Farm and I have a tendency to listen to Farm more than Beyond. It’s an awesome album, don’t get me wrong they are both great, but I like Farm more. Especially the album art featured below:

Here’s a quote from Marc Masters (who I agree with wholeheartedly with) at pitchfork about the album:
Beyond, the first album to feature the original Dinosaur Jr. lineup since their 1980s heyday, was so surprisingly good it was tempting to call it a fluke. Tempting, but wrong– two years after its release, it still sounds great, on par with the early, hallowed triumvirate of Dinosaur, You’re Living All Over Me, and Bug. For any cynics still chalking Beyond up to luck, Farm should blast the scales from your jaded eyes. Energetic, confident, and catchy, it’s even more compelling than Beyond.
Read more of his review here.

Lake of Fire

March 13, 2010

Lake of Fire is a great song by the Meat Puppets, Nirvana covered it and it was also lovely. The track came off of their 1982 album Meat Puppets II, Nirvana also covered Oh Me and Plateau from this album. Furthermore, the Minutemen did the Meat Puppet’s Lost on their EP Tour-Spiel.

I’m going to go out on a limb and say this is one of the most original and best albums of the 80s. Of course, Pitchfork agrees with me. Here’s what they posted (which is way better than anything I could write):

Like apple and pie, like bass and balls, country n’ hardcore just go together in that all-American way. Though the Meat Puppets’ second record is often filed under this fusion (and credited as the first to make the connection), there was really a lot more going on here than the “cowpunk” label can account for. The main thrust of the album was more psychedelic, using the claustrophobic tightness of punk and the vastness of Americana as head-metaphors, analogies for two distinct states of being really goddamn freaked out. And, while many of their heirs got the punk part right, few could approximate the huge, haunted spaces that lurk in the darker corners of this album, threatening to swallow even the most manic of the band’s outbursts.” –Brendan Reid

Daydreaming days in a daydream nation…

October 7, 2009

Tonight is Radio Loveless from 8 to 10 pm on KRUI 89.7 fm or online here. The title of today’s post can be found in the album below:
daydream

1. I’m going to start with a live version of Sonic Youth’s Hyperstation off of the reissued Daydream Nation Box set. This album first came out in 1988, and was Sonic Youth’s fifth album.
2. Yo La Tengo, Popular Songs, Periodically Double or Triple
Yes, the twelfth album from Yo La Tengo has arrived.
Popularsongs
3. Tortoise, TNT, The Equator
This mostly instrumental band formed back in 1990 and are still recording. TNT was released in 1998.
4. The Mary Onettes, Puzzles-Single, Puzzles
This sounds like early 80s sweet synth-pop. I love it, it came out last month.
Here’s a review of the band by Pitchfork.
5. Echo and the Bunnymen, Songs to Learn and Sing, The Back of Love
This compilation album was released in 1985, the single was originally released in 1982 and added to their Porcupine release.
6. The Cure, Faith (1981), Faith
7. Elliott Smith, From a Basement On the Hill (2004), A Passing Feeling
fromabase
8. Sebadoh, III (1991), The Freed Pig
9. Frank Zappa, Apostrophe’ (1974)/Overnite Sensation, Don’t Eat the Yellow Snow (A Request!)
10. Polvo, In Prism, Beggar’s Bowl
In Prism is Polvo’s fifth studio album released on Merge Records and their first since 1997’s Shapes. Beggar’s Bowl is streaming on line here.
Polvo_InPrism_Package
11. Uzeda, Stella (Sicilian group formed in 1987, this album came out in 2006), This Heat
12. Cocteau Twins, Head Over Heals (1983), My Love Paramour
13. Mogwai, Rock Action (2001), Take Me Somewhere Nice
14. Gene Loves Jezebel, Voodoo Dollies-The Best of Gene Loves Jezebel, Bruises
15. The Evens, Get Evens (2006), Eventually
16. Beefeater, Plays for Lovers (1985) & House Burning Down (1987), A Dog Day
17. Mission of Burma, The Definitive Editions Compilation, All World Cowboy Romance
Originally this track was off of Signals, Calls, and Marches released in 1981.
18. Grant Lee Buffalo, Mighty Joe Moon (1994), Sing Along

19. The Jayhawks, Tomorrow the Green Grass (1995), Ten Little Kids
20. TV on the Radio, Dear Science, DLZ
(I dare you not to dance.)

21. New Order, (The Best Of) New Order, Let’s Go (Nothing for Me)
22. Gang of Four, Entertainment (1979), At Home He’s a Tourist
23. XTC, Go 2 (1978), Are You Receiving Me?
24. Les Savy Fav, 3/5 (1997), Scout’s Honor
25. Q and not U, Hot and Informed-EP, Busy Lights Busy Carpet
26. Sunny Day Real Estate, Diary, Song About an Angel